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  "The following architects have accepted commissions in cooperation with the Case Study House Program," as the program announcement from January 1945 states. The biographies are not current but were published contemporaneously with the Case Study House period and with the date of death added.

  A. Quincy Jones (1913–1979) of Jones and Emmons. Born in Kansas City, Missouri. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Washington. Opened his own office in 1945. The firm of Smith, Jones and Contini was formed in 1948. Went into partnership with Frederick E. Emmons in 1950. Visiting Critic and Lecturer in the School of Architecture, University of Southern California, since 1952. Fellow of American Institute of Architects.

  Alfred Newman Beadle (1927–1998) Born St. Paul, Minnesota. Trained in construction during World War II as a Seabee, Beadle moved to Phoenix, Arizona in the early 1950s and built a variety of commercial and residential projects. Beadle is best known for designing Case Study Apartment #1. All of Beadle's output reflects a rigorous, rectilinear modernist idiom consistent with the work of Mies van der Rohe and the postwar steel-frame houses. He is known for his stylish mid-century residential housing stock and for his influence on desert modernism.

  Calvin C. Straub (1921–1998) of Buff, Straub & Hensman. Born in Macon, Georgia. Studied at Texas A and M, Claremont College, University of Mexico. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California. Project director for Arthur B. Gallion, Dean of School of Architecture, U.S.C. Private practice 1950-1956. Member of Buff, Straub and Hensman 1956-1961. Associate Professor, School of Architecture, U.S.C., 1946-1961. Professor, School of Architecture, Arizona State University, 1961.

  Charles Eames (1907–1978) Born in St. Louis, Missouri. Studied architecture in St. Louis and Washington Universities. Travelled abroad. Practiced architecture and industrial design in the Middle West. Developed the Experimental Design Department of Cranbrook Academy of Art, working with Eliel Saarinen. Won two first awards in the Museum of Modern Art's Organic Design Competition. He is identified with the war effort through the development of his process for molding wood and the design of essential items and the techniques for their manufacture.

  Conrad Buff III (1926–1989) of Buff, Straub & Hensman. Born in Glendale, California. Son of Conrad Buff II, landscape painter. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California. Chief draftsman for Paul Kingsbury; two years as designer for Clayton Baldwin. Entered partnership with Donald C. Hensman in 1947. Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, U.S.C.

  Craig Ellwood (1922–1992) Born in Clarenden, Texas. Started his design career after World War II as a cost estimator, job supervisor and draftsman for a contractor who built work of Neutra, Soriano, etc. Opened own architectural office in 1948. Studied engineering at University of California at Los Angeles, Extension Division, 1949-1954. First prize International Exhibition of Architecture, Sao Paulo, 1954. Visiting critic at Yale University, Syracuse University, Cornell University.

  David Thorne (1924–) Bachelor of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 1950; Draftsman, David S. Johnson, Architect, 1950-1951; traveled in Scandinavia, other European countries and the Middle East, 1951-1953; Draftsman, Roger Lee, Architect, 1953-1954; Professional Awards: College: American Iron and Steel Institute Award for the Bartlett House, Fresno, CA, 1959. Editor's note: Beverley David Thorne is among the last surviving architects from the Case Study Houses project.

  Don R. Knorr (1927–) Born 1927. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Illinois, 1947. Postgraduate work at Cranbrook Academy of Art, 1948. Opened practice in architecture and interior design in 1949. Three years as project manager with Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, San Francisco. Two years as designer with Eero Saarinen. Member of faculty of Department of Architecture, University of Illinois. The office of Knorr and Elliott was established in San Francisco in 1957.

  Donn Emmons FAIA (1910–1997) of Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons. Born in NY state, attended Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, and lived in Los Angeles in the early 1930s. Relocated to San Francisco late 1930s. Education: Coursework, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1929-1933; Coursework, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 1934; Studied with the San Francisco Architecture Club. Worked as draftsman, William Wilson Wurster, Architect, c. 1938-1941 then partner in 1946; Younger brother of Frederick E. Emmons.

  Donald C. Hensman (1922–2002) of Buff, Straub & Hensman. Born in Omaha, Nebraska. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California. Designer for Langdon and Wilson. Partnership with Conrad Buff III since 1947. Critic, School of Architecture, University of Southern California.

  Edward A. Killingsworth (1917–2004) of Killingsworth, Brady & Smith. Born in Taft, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, Cum Laude, University of Southern California, 1940, Firm of Klllingsworth, Brady and Smith formed in 1953. Sao Paulo Biennial Medal, 1961. Among his numerous awards are four for the Case Study Triad: two A.I.A.-Western Homes Awards, for House A and House C; National A.I.A. House & Home Award of Merit for the Triad; and a National A.I.A. Honorable Mention for House A.

  Eero Saarinen (1910–1961) of Saarinen and Swanson. Born in Kirkkunummi, Finland, and came to the United States in 1923. Attended art school in Paris (sculpture), Yale School of Architecture, Yale Scholarship to Europe. From 1936 to 1939 he did extensive city planning research and other architectural work. From 1939 to 1942 he was associated with Eliel Saarinen and Robert Swanson. When associated with Perkins, Weiler and Wile, Tabernacle Christian Church, Columbus, Indiana, and Centerline Housing Project, Centerline, Michigan, were built.

  Frederick E. Emmons (1907–1999) of Jones and Emmons. Born in Olean, New York. Bachelor of Architecture degree, Cornell University, 1929. Office of Allen Siple, Los Angeles. Partnership with A. Quincy Jones since 1950. Visiting Critic, Cornell University, 1959.

  J. R. Davidson (1888–1977) Born in Berlin, Germany. Studied in Germany, England, and France. He came to the United States in 1923 and established private practice in 1925. He is recognized for the first modern designs of stores, restaurants, offices, single and multiple residences and interiors in Los Angeles and Chicago. He has been instructor at the Art Center School in Los Angeles since 1938. In 1937, he received recognition from the Royal Institute of British Architects; first prize winner in the Pittsburgh Glass Competition in 1938.

  John Carden Campbell (1914–1996) of Campbell and Wong and Associates. Studied at Sacramento Community College, Sacramento, CA; coursework, Art Students League, San Francisco, CA; coursework, Rudolph Schaeffer School of Design, San Francisco, CA; Partner, Campbell and Wong, Architects, San Francisco, CA, 1946-1968; In addition to Case Study House No. 27, his notable structures include Bartlett-Campbell Apartments, Sausalito, CA; Hotel Leger, Mokelumne Hills, CA; Prefabricated House, Mill Valley, CA; Weekend House, Nevada City, CA.

  John Rex FAIA (1923–) Born in Georgia. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1932. Traveled in Europe. Went into the office of Sumner Spaulding as a draftsman, later became an associate and finally a member of the firm Spaulding, Rex and DeSwarte. After the death of Spaulding he went into partnership with Douglas Honnold. Fifth year critic at U.S.C. and on the faculty of the School of Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles. Chairman of the Board of Zoning Appeals for the City of Los Angeles.

  Jules Brady (1908–) of Killingsworth, Brady & Smith. Born in Long Beach, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1940. Designer, city and regional planner for cities of Honolulu and Long Beach. Partnership with Killingsworth and Smith formed in 1953.

  Kemper Nomland (1892–1976) Born in Buxton, North Dakota. Bachelor of Architecture degree, Columbia University, 1916. Worked in a number of architectural offices in New York, Seattle and Los Angeles. Opened his own office in Los Angeles in 1928. Served as a Commissioner on the Los Angeles Board of Building and Safety.

  Kemper Nomland, Jr. (1919–2009) Born in Los Angeles, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1941. Worked in the office of Albert C. Martin. After World War II joined his father's architectural office. Designed the 1947 Case Study House while working with father; was licensed three years later,

  Pierre Koenig (1925–2004) Born in San Francisco, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1952. Several months in office of Raphael Soriano. Office of Jones and Emmons. Designed his first steel-framed house in 1950 while a student. Opened own practice 1954. Awards: Homes for Better Living, 1957; Sao Paulo IV International Exhibition of Architecture, 1957; A.I.A.-Western Homes Award of Honor, 1959; A.I.A.-House &. Home Award, 1960. On faculty of School of Architecture, U.S.C.

  Ralph Rapson (1915–2008) Born in Alma, Michigan. He spent two years at Alma College, Alma, Michigan, and three years at the College of Architecture, University of Michigan. He received a scholarship at Cranbrook Academy of Art and studied architecture and civic planning under Eliel Saarinen. He was co-designer of the "Fabric House" and the "Cave House." His work has been chiefly in the residential field and in housing. He is now head of the Architectural Department at the Institute of Design in Chicago. Member of C.I.A.M.

  Raphael S. Soriano (1907–1988) Born on the Island of Rhodes. College of St. John, French School in Rhodes. Came to the United States, 1924. U.S. citizenship, 1930. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1934. Several months employment with Richard Neutra. Critic and guest lecturer at University of Southern California, Yale, other universities. In private practice since 1936, pioneering the development of housing in steel construction. Moved his office from Los Angeles to Tiburon, near San Francisco, in 1953.

  Richard J. Neutra (1892–1970) Born in Vienna, Austria and came to the United States in 1923 after having been in the practice of architecture in Europe. He has been in Los Angeles since 1926. Member of American Institute of Architects. He has practiced in California, Oregon, Texas, and Illinois. He was elected as the first American delegate of Les Congres Inter-nationaux d'Architecture Modern and is now president of this world-wide professional organization.

  Rodney Walker (1910–1986) Born in Salt Lake City, Utah. Two years of engineering at Pasadena City College; three years at University of California at Los Angeles studying art and mechanic arts, graduated 1938. Draftsman in office of R. M. Schindler, 1938. Has been designing and building on his own since 1939, except for the war years, spent in the Engineering Department at Douglas Aircraft Co. Moved to Ojai Valley in 1956 where he works as designer and builder and in the field of planning and development.

  Sumner Spaulding (1892–1952) Architect and city planner. Born in Ionia, Michigan, June 14, 1892. He attended the University of Michigan from 1911 to 1913, and received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1916. He has traveled and studied in Europe and in Mexico. He is the designer of many country estates; the Catalina Casino for William Wrigley Jr.; the men's campus at Pomona College, Los Angeles Civic Center Municipal Airport. He has taught architecture both at the University of Southern California and at Scripps College.

  Theodore C. Bernardi (1903–1990 ) of Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons. Born in Korcula, Yugoslavia. Graduated from College of Architecture, University of California at Berkeley, 1924. Went into office of William Wilson Wurster 1936. Undertook government housing projects with other associates during the war years, returning in 1944 to the Wurster firm as a partner, Lecturer University of California since 1954. Member San Francisco Planning and Urban Renewal Association. The firm is now Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons.

  Thornton M. Abell (1906–1984) Born in South Haven, Michigan. Studied at the University of Michigan, University of California, and received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Southern California in 1931. Opened his own office in 1944. Taught interior design at Chouinard Art Institute, 1949 to 1952; Critic, School of Architecture, U.S.C., 1953 to date.

  Waugh Smith (1917–2010) of Killingsworth, Brady & Smith. Born in California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, Cum Laude, University of California, Berkeley, 1940. Design of heavy construction for Standard Oil in Java before formation of firm Killingsworth, Brady and Smith in 1953.

  Whitney R. Smith FAIA (1911–2002) Born in Pasadena, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1934. Staff of Farm Security Administration. Smith, Jones and Contini joined in partnership in 1948. In 1949 formed his present partnership with Wayne R. Williams. Instructor in Advanced Planning and Architecture at U.S.C., 1941 to 1942. Instructor in Architecture and Planning at Scripps College, 1947 to 1952. Past member of the South Pasadena Planning Commission. Advisory Board of U.S.C. School of Architecture.

  William Wilson Wurster (1895–1998) of Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons. Born in California. Educated in the public schools of Stockton, later entered the University of California. After travel abroad he returned to work in New York, then private practice in California in 1924. Closed his office 1943 to devote his time to war and postwar architectural problems, doing special research on Urbanism and Planning at Harvard as a Fellow in the graduate school of design. Now dean of the School of Architecture and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  Worley K. Wong (1912–1985) of Campbell and Wong and Associates. Born in California. Educated in Oakland, CA city schools and at the Lignan School, Canton, China; attended Saint Mary's College, Moraga, CA, c. 1932; B.Arch. with Honors, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 1936; Elected for design to Fellowship in the American Institute of Architects, 1961; In addition to Case Study House No. 27, his notable structures include Bartlett-Campbell Apartments, Sausalito, CA; Hotel Leger, Mokelumne Hills, CA; Woman's Day House Project - 1959.


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